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New measures introduced in Tasmania should help landlords and tenants ride out the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock

Tasmania offers landlords a lifeline

Tasmania has established a new Landlord Support Fund and extended its moratorium on evictions, with protections for residential tenants to remain in place until December 1.

Tasmania has established a new Landlord Support Fund and extended its moratorium on evictions, with protections for residential tenants to remain in place until December 1.

Additional support measures were also put in place, including a second round of payments under Tasmania’s Rent Relief Fund, and allowing tenants in arrears to set up a repayment plan through the Residential Tenancy Commissioner. 

Under the Landlord Support Fund, property owners could be eligible for up to $2,000 in financial relief if they can demonstrate they have a tenant behind on rent payments.

Real Estate Institute of Australia president Adrian Kelly said the Tasmanian government’s response should be commended.

“It realistically acknowledges that it is both tenants and landlords that may be suffering from the adverse impacts of the pandemic by offering assistance to both,” Mr Kelly said.

“It also makes it clear that a repayment plan needs to be negotiated – an area where real estate professionals can assist.”

Mr Kelly encouraged all state premiers and housing ministers to look closely at Tasmania’s approach, which has leveraged the strength of the real estate sector to address the needs of both tenants and landlords.

“The real estate profession has acted quickly and responsibly in response to developments to date including managing day-to-day issues between tenants and owners and being responsible for the care and maintenance of the property and ensuring the health and safety of tenants, their visitors, customers, clients and staff. It will continue to do so,” he said.

 

“Tasmania has outlined a sensible and pragmatic framework with a very clear signal for other jurisdictions less affected by COVID to look at carefully.”

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