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Sharing is caring in homes of the future
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How a home interacts with its environment is expected to be a big factor in future construction.

Sharing is caring in homes of the future

The large, standalone traditional family house may be destined to become a relic of the past, as homes of the future become smaller structures featuring communal spaces that embrace and adapt to nature.

The large, standalone traditional family house may be destined to become a relic of the past, as homes of the future become smaller structures featuring communal spaces that embrace and adapt to nature.

Allianz Australia and University of Technology Sydney partnered with horticulturist and television personality Jamie Durie to predict how homes will be built, powered and decorated in the future.

According to the House Rules host, the rules are going out the repurposed window.

The Future of Living report revealed COVID-19 has accelerated a move to more sustainable housing and design trends are rapidly evolving as Millennials embrace a ‘shared economy’ approach to housing.

Homes will become smaller with fewer rooms and many facilities such as kitchens, living rooms and bathrooms could be shared with a collective of neighbours as harsh financial realities shape future economies and communities.

Outdoor and indoor living is forecast to be combined and an eclectic, new interior decorating style created.

The report has revealed how the socioeconomic and environmental factors the younger generation are navigating will affect house design and home-living. 

“I think with COVID-19, we’ve had a bit of a kick up the bum,” Mr Durie said.

“Now we’re thinking about how we can live life in a more frugal way, how to downsize and how to minimise our impact on the environment.”

Five major changes

The report identified five key themes that it says “will change the way Australians live and purchase property forever.”

The share economy, with its common usage of office space, cars and accommodation will prompt Australians to create living arrangements featuring new approaches to communal spaces and shared resources. 

Concerns about the environment will push recycling, and carbon emissions to top-of-mind, for Gen Z and Millennials looking to fight climate change with sustainable options used for the interior and exterior fabric of their homes. 

Future homeowners can expect to see native greenery rife throughout interior and exterior structures. Exotic gardens are also expected to make way for outdoor spaces with drought-resistant native plants that regulate heat and help insulate the home.

The substantial growth of the Australian population will require vast quantities of construction material. The report suggests a shift toward more sustainable standards in the construction industry, with younger generations looking to build with locally sourced materials, like timber in place of brick or concrete.

In consideration of not only environmental but economic factors too, future generations will choose to be more discerning with their interiors and use what is already available. This will include unfinished looks and mismatched objects that strike a balance between elegance and style and raw and unrefined aesthetics.

Allianz Australia general manager of home and lifestyle, Rachael Poole, said we all have a shared responsibility to invest in a sustainable future for our communities and planet. 

“The Future of Living report provides Australians with an understanding of, and inspiration into, how families will be living in their homes in years to come,” Ms Poole said.

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